Kwaebibirem

hon-faustina-korantemaa-addo-dce

DISTRICT CHIEF EXECUTIVE’S PERSONAL PROFILE

NAME                          :           HON. FAUSTINA KORANTEMAA ADDO

DATE OF BIRTH          :           25TH JANUARY, 1956

HOMETOWN                :           KADE E/R

GENDER                      :           FEMALE

OFFICE ADDRESS      :           KWAEBIBIREM DISTRICT ASSEMBLY, P. O. BOX 19, KADE

E-MAIL                         :           fausddo@yahoo.com

TELEPHONE                :           054-8746478/0273848473

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENTS

  • EXECUTIVE MBA (PROJECT MANAGEMENT), UNIVERSITY OF GHANA BUSINESS SCHOOL, LEGON ACCRA – 2011
  • MEMBER OF THE CHATERED INSTITUTE OF PURCHASING AND SUPPLY UK-2009
  • POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN COMMUNICATION STUDIES, UNIVERSITY OF GHANA -1981
  • A. HONS. (POLITICAL SCIENCE) UNIVERSITY OF GHANA – 1979
  • C.E. ‘A’ LEVEL, ST. MONICAS SECONDARY SCHOOL, MAMPONG ASHANTI – 1976.
  • C. E ‘O’ LEVEL, AKIM ODA SECONDARY SCHOOL-1973

FORMER PLACE OF WORK

  • FEDERAL SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCE, SOKOTO NIGERIA- 1982 TO 1987
  • GHANA SUPPLY COMPANY LIMITED, 1987 TO 2003
  • COCOA MERCHANT GHANA LIMITED, 2006-2014.

HOBBIES

  • LISTENING TO MUSIC
  • READING

 

 

elias-kwaku-mensah-dcd

DISTRICT CORDINATING DIRECTOR’S PERSONAL PROFILE

NAME                          :           ELIAS KWAKU MENSAH

DATE OF BIRTH          :           28TH MAY, 1960

HOMETOWN                :           ABUTIA-TETI-V/R

GENDER                      :           MALE

RANK                              :             DISTRICT CO-ORDINATING DIRECTOR

OFFICE ADDRESS      :           KWAEBIBIREM DISTRICT ASSEMBLY, P. O. BOX 19, KADE

E-MAIL                         :           eliaskmens@yahoo.com

TELEPHONE                :           +233-(0)24-4884471 / +233-(0)50-6050888

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENTS

  • A.(GOVERNANCE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT) – UNIVERSITY OF CAPE COAST (MARCH 2013)
  • POST GRADUATE DIP. IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION, GIMPA (MARCH 2013)
  • POST GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION – GIMPA (JULY, 200)
  • BACHELOR OF ARTS (SOCIOLOGY) – UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, LEGON (JUNE, 1997)
  • CERTIFICATE IN COMPUTER PROFICIENCY LICENSE – GIMPA (OCTOBER 2012)
  • C.E. ‘A’ LEVEL – PRIVATE CANDIDATE
  • C. E ‘O’ LEVEL- NKWANTA SECONDARY SCHOOL (JUNE 1980)

HOBBIES

  • READING NOVELS
  • TRAVELLING

 

 

Location and Size of the District

The Kwaebibirem District is located in the South-western corner of the Eastern Region of Ghana, between Latitudes 1 degree 0’W and O degree 35.’E and Longitudes 6 degrees 22’N and 5 degrees 75’S.  On the North, it is bounded by the Birim North District, on the East by Atiwa District and East Akim Municipal, on the south by Denkyembour District.

 

Brief History of the District

The Kwaebibirem district is one of the 26 Districts in the Eastern Region, with Kade as its capital. The district, which has a land area of about 12.30 km² (472.4 sq miles), however, Denkyembour was created out of Kwaebibirem under LI 2042 leaving Kwaebibirem as a District under LI 2043 in (2012).

According to 2010 Population and Housing Census, the current population is 113,721 with 42.7% and 57.3% living in the urban and rural areas respectively. Farming is the predominant economic activity, employing about 47.8% of the economically active population and thus serves as the main source of livelihood.

 

The dominant tribe is Akan, though pockets of tribes like Akuapems, Ningos, Northerners Ewes and Krobos have come to settle either as farmers or miners throughout the District.

 

Relief and Drainage

The major mountain range, the Atiwa, is found in the North-East of the District around Dwenase and Apinamang.  Apart from this area, the general climb in the District is less than 500 meters, in between heights are extensive marshlands.

The Birim River traverses the District from the North to the South.  Besides the Birim, there are other notable rivers such as Kadepon, Pram, Subinsa, Mmo and Apaam.  One major feature of these rivers, except the Birim, is that it easily gets flooded during the rainy season which affects large tracts of low-lying lands.

Temperature

Temperature ranges between a minimum of 26.50C and a maximum of 270C.

Rainfall

The District lies within the semi-equatorial climate zone with a double maximal rainfall regime.

The highest annual rainfall of 2024mm was recorded in 2011. The District’s maximum rainfall period coincides with the planting season.  For planning and more specifically for

Agricultural activities, distribution of rainfall rather than its intensity is more relevant.

Gender Mainstream

A little over half of the District’s population are females and logically needs specific attention targeted at prioritised projects and programmes aimed at improving the living conditions of this target group.

Within this target group, there are aggregate of special groups with different needs.  These special groups include-girl child, women in various occupations to the issues of gender with specific reference to women and girl child intends to collaborate with the NCCE, Department of Social Welfare and Department of Community Development.  The priority will be focused on providing legal aid and legal education for women, to empower women through access to justice programme as well as promote and protect women’s rights through the provision of legal aid and legal education.  The project intends to share trends of women’s rights violations and create quick referrals systems among the actors, including the Police, judiciary and non-governmental organisations. The programme intends to educate women at the markets and the community on their human rights through the organisation of community outreaches and to offer legal services.  Other activities include encouraging women to go to court to seek redress and educate them on economic, marital, property rights and child maintenance.  Gender issues with particular emphasis on women is given priority through the activities of Business Advisory Centre under the supervision of National Board for Small Scale Industries trains women in entrepreneurial skills to upgrade their knowledge and competence in production, packaging and marketing.

The rationale of the project is to empower the targeted groups (women) who are regularly denied their property rights and child support for their children.  The girl child is to be targeted and supported through STME while education will be given to the traditional authorities to moderate the treatment of widows. Strategies include prioritizing NBSSIs activities targeting training of women and interested men in entrepreneurial skills. Priority will be given to the education of parents on the importance of girl child education, PTA, SMC, DEOC and STME for girls. In addition, cultural education, formation of virgin clubs will be encouraged.

 Economic Dependency

The role of resources, especially human resources, in generating growth and development cannot be over-looked in any development scheme.  It is for this reason that this section seeks to assess the nature and level of dependency as it relates to the economic development of the district.  Primary information gathered from socio-economic surveys gave an economic dependency ratio of 1:1.14, which shows that an employed person takes care of a person who is unemployed in addition to him or herself.  The situation is not bad but should not be allowed to again further currency in the light of low per capita incomes and high per capita consumption expenditures.

Rural-Urban Split

Information from the 2010 PHC indicated 42.7% of the  district’s population resides in Urban locality while 57.3% are in the Rural locality.  At current growth rate 1.9 it is expected that settlements like, Abaam,  Takyiman ,Nkwantanang, an Otudmi will assume urban status in the near future.  This is a welcomed development as it provides an opportunity for concentrating investments at this centers and making them growth poles with the expected trickle-down  or multiplier effects to neighboring settlements.

Employment

The predominant occupation in the district is in Agriculture, which engaged 47.8% of the economically active labour force. The next after agriculture is  Trade/Commerce in the form of Wholesale and retail; repair of motorcycles  accounting for 15%.  Manufacturing employed 12.5 % and Accommodation and food service activities5.5% respectively.

The presence of abundant potentials in mining and agricultural sectors of the district economy is the recipe for the influx of people from other parts of Ghana.  Table 1.11below shows the tribal distribution in the district.

The people are predominantly of the Akyem tradition and this reflects in their culture. The area falls under the Akyem Abuakwa jurisdiction with the Okyehene as its traditional head. In terms of division, the area is under the Oseawuo, with the Oseawuohene as the divisional head. The next in command to the Oseawuo are the Osabarimas who are four in the district. Following the Osabarimas are the Barimas who are chiefs of the various towns and villages in the area. The last in rank are the Adikoros in charge of smaller settlements who have been nominated to take charge of other settlements. They may not be necessary of Akyem extraction.

The major festivals of the Akyem Abuakwa people are Ohum kan and Ohum kyire which are celebrated between June/July and September respectively every year. However the people of Kade have of late created their own festival.The people of Kade celebrate the Ekaade festival which is celebrated during the last quarter of the year. These week long festivals climaxed with a grand durbar of the chiefs and people where funds are raised to support development projects in the towns. Aside the development oriented nature of these festivals, the period is used to remember the dead and purify the various black stools.

Chieftaincy disputes in the district is not a major problem, however there are two towns namely Nkwantanang and Pramkese which have serious chieftaincy problems. The problems have existed for years and this has affected development and communal spirit in these two towns.

 Migration

People who come from the District constituted 96.4% of the entire population, other Ghanaians by dual nationality and naturalization were 2.1%, the rest of the population thus 1.5% are non Ghanaians such as ECOWAS, Africans other than ECOWAS and people from outside Africa. Considering the place of birth, 68.8% of the people counted were born at the same locality of enumeration, 17.8% born at different locality and 13.5% of the people were born outside the District.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SITUATION

Scenic Areas

In planning the spatial development of  the Kwaebibirem District, attention was  given to the forest cover and the mineral resources of the land.  As these resources form the basis for economic development, due consideration  exercised so that the natural endowment of the district was  not over exploited at the expense of cultural and environmental conservation.

 

Farming

The people of Kwaebibirem District are peasant farmers, who depend on rain-fed irregation, labour intensive and relatively cheap subsistence agriculture.  This trend is likely to continue for a long time.  In this wise over exploitation of the forest cover can change this medium of sustenance, hence creating more problems for the district as well as for the nation.  It is therefore important that the resources of the district are exploited sustainably with emphasis on good  environmental practices.

 

Soil Erosion

In some of the settlements notably Kade, Abaam ,Asuom, Kwea and Adankrono erosion has eaten deep into buildings and for that matter  their foundations are exposed.  It was therefore important to ensure that physical development activities are established within a safe distance (200-1000 feet) from  a  foot-hill of a high area  so as to prevent land slides and accelerated soil erosion. Also in the built environment, tree planting was recormended to people as part of development with the aim of reducing the incidence of soil erosion.

Rivers and Streams

The district is drained by the Birim, which flows from the north to the south.  In addition to the Birim River, other notable rivers such as Kadepon, Pram, Subinsa and Abaam exist.  Apart from the Birim River, all the other rivers are bounded by large tracks of low lying lands that are liable to flooding in the rainy season.

As land around was cleared for farming activities, the smaller rivers experienced excessive evaporation for most parts of the year.  This led to water shortage especially in the dry seasons.

This situation was adequately addressed by embarking on reforestation along the bank of rivers as well as checking the rate of pollution of the river.  Drainage systems for streams within built- up areas was properly managed to avoid flooding during rainy seasons.

Deforestation and Small-Scale Mining

Deforestation within the district has been caused by the prevalence of bush burning, illegal chain saw operations and over exploitation of forest resource by timber firms.  Trees, most especially the economic ones, have been destroyed which has subsequently affected the micro-climatic conditions in the area. This situation was most felt in the urban areas.  For the forests to continue to play their role in the economic and environmental conditions of the district, the emphasis in the management of the environment should lean towards that of protective forests.  And for that matter, Forestry Commission has been well equipped to check illegal timber felling, and also to arrest unlicensed chain saw operators. Chain saw operators were encouraged to form co-operative societies to serve as watch dogs to curb the activities of illegal operators and also planting of trees.

 

Activities of illegal mining in Kwaebibirem District are concentrated in Abodom, Abaam, Okyenso Krobo respectively.  This activity was causing serious environmental hazards to the district, as pits are created and scattered about the area and vegetation destroyed. Galamsey operators are been arrested and prosecuted and sometimes compelled to reclaim the destroyed lands. This exercise was usually spear-headed by DISEC, led by the District Chief Executive. By this, adequate land had been reclaimed or reserved for agriculture and other purposes reducing the pollution of natural water bodies.

Energy

Results from the 2010 PHC indicated that, out of the various sources of cooking fuel, the three most significant sources were woodfuel constituting 57%, charcoal 26.4% and Gas 8%.This implied that a larger percentage of the population depended heavily on the forest (woodfuel and charcoal) for their source of cooking fuel.This situation was alarming, considering the fact that the forests is  increasingly been exploited  as against agriculture and other forest use.  This was creating environmental problems.  It was then  very necessary to prevent this trend and as a result, the District Assembly in collaboration with other stakeholders such as the Forestry Commission, the Agricultural Department etc. initiated the following measures, thus,   encouraged  residents to use liquified petroleum  gas (LPG), as well as the introduction of a near-substitute in the form of improved stoves i.e. cube/compressed saw-dust, which are noted for conserving energy.

They also undertook educational outreach on the effects of deforestation. Individuals and organized bodies in the   local communities were encouraged to embark on wood lot cultivation for their domestic fuel consumption.